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Divorce is a difficult process, and the grounds for divorce vary among states. In Pennsylvania, the law provides several options for couples seeking to end their marriage. In this article, we’ll discuss the grounds for fault divorce in Pennsylvania, and whether the state is a “no fault” divorce state.

Grounds for Fault Divorce in Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, the law provides a list of grounds for fault divorce. These grounds are the legal reasons for which a spouse may seek to end their marriage. They include:

Adultery: Adultery is defined as voluntary sexual intercourse between a married person and someone who is not their spouse.

• Desertion: Desertion is defined as a spouse’s intentional and continuous abandonment of one’s marital duties for a period of at least one year.

• Cruel and Barbarous Treatment: This ground applies when one spouse has committed acts that make it unsafe or improper to continue living with the other.

• Bigamy: Bigamy occurs when one spouse has married someone else while still married to their current spouse.

• Indignities: Indignities are defined as words, actions, or treatment that tend to degrade the other
spouse’s condition of life, make it intolerable, and render his or her continued cohabitation unsafe or improper.

• Imprisonment: If a spouse is sentenced to a term of imprisonment of two or more years, the other spouse may file for divorce.

• Insanity: If one spouse has been confined for at least 18 months in a mental institution and is still confined, their spouse may file for a divorce.

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Is Pennsylvania a No Fault Divorce State?

No. Pennsylvania is not a no fault divorce state, meaning that spouses must provide evidence of fault in order to obtain a divorce. However, it is possible to obtain a “no fault” divorce in Pennsylvania by filing a “no-fault” divorce petition. This petition allows a couple to divorce without proving fault, but the couple must still fulfill certain requirements, such as living separately for at least two years prior to filing.

Divorce is a difficult process, and the grounds for divorce vary among states. In Pennsylvania, the law provides several options for couples seeking to end their marriage, including grounds for fault divorce and the option to file for a “no fault” divorce. If you’re considering filing for divorce in Pennsylvania, it’s important to understand the state’s laws and requirements, and consult with an attorney to ensure that your rights and interests are protected.